NUTRITION FOR VOLLEYBALL

NUTRITION FOR VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball is a high intensity game requiring speed and large muscle groups for actions such as jumping, spiking, blocking, and retrieving the ball. These activity patterns are intermittent with periods of high-competitive intensity followed by rest or periods of low intensity. If a player spends an equal amount of time between the front and back courts, these high intensity efforts can occur in shorts bouts every 30 s of play over a total period of 30 min to 180 min. Volleyball is also a technical game with attention and decision making needed during matches.

Sports Drinks Science Reading NUTRITION FOR VOLLEYBALL 7 minutes

Volleyball is a high intensity game requiring speed and large muscle groups for actions such as jumping, spiking, blocking, and retrieving the ball. These activity patterns are intermittent with periods of high-competitive intensity followed by rest or periods of low intensity. If a player spends an equal amount of time between the front and back courts, these high intensity efforts can occur in shorts bouts every 30 s of play over a total period of 30 min to 180 min. Volleyball is also a technical game with attention and decision making needed during matches.

Nutrition is essential for the volleyball athlete to meet the high energy requirements of training and competition. In addition to eating enough, the right proportion of macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein and fats) are needed to provide the right fuel to maintain lean tissue mass, immune and reproductive function, and maintain optimal performance.

High intensity activity that is anaerobic uses carbohydrate (CHO) as fuel. This is because CHO can be used without oxygen. Fat on the other hand requires oxygen to be used for fuel and is used during aerobic periods (in combination with CHO). The brain uses CHO exclusively for fuel and is therefore essential to maintain attention and the ability to make correct decisions during matches.

Research has shown that female volleyball players fail to meet energy demands in both training and competition. A consequence of persistent low energy intakes to meet demands means the body will use fat and lean tissue mass (muscle) for fuel, and strength and endurance are compromised. Carbohydrate intakes are restricted in female athletes, which impacts glycogen storage.

Glycogen is the storage form of glucose. When we eat CHO, they are converted to glucose molecules, which are stored as glycogen in the liver and muscle. These glycogen stores are finite, and we can only store so much. High-intensity exercise uses glycogen at a higher rate than aerobic exercise, and the limited storage capacity is why carbohydrate drinks, gels and foods are recommended for athletes during prolonged activity and exercise.

 

WHY?

Mānuka Honey is primarily carbohydrates (~ 80%), mostly glucose (~ 30 – 35%) and fructose (~ 35 – 40%). Mānuka Honey also contains vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. The glucose and fructose provide energy to working muscles during prolonged activity, and activity interspersed with high intensity efforts. Glucose is absorbed faster, while fructose is absorbed slower. This means a more sustained supply of energy to the working muscles. Research shows exercise performance improvements for glucose-fructose solutions if the exercise is over 2 hours in duration, and in intermittent type activities. The electrolytes in our gels help with the absorption of the carbohydrate.

 

HOW MUCH?

t is recommended to consume carbohydrate at a rate of 60 g/hour during sessions over 2 hours long, and 30 – 60 g/hour for sessions that are 60 – 90 minutes long. Most research has used athletes and well-trained athletes. Athletes who perform at lower exercise intensities may have lower carbohydrate oxidation rates and will not need as much. While the general recommendations are established by literature and scientific evidence, there are always individual differences, so test the timing and dose during training sessions to find what works for you Our Mānuka honey LiquidFuel provides 24.8g of natural carbohydrate per serve.

 

WHEN?

Honey can be used before exercise, and due to its lower GI will provide a more sustained release of glucose during the exercise session. LiquidFuel can be used 30 minutes prior to training and/or matches. Due to its high carbohydrate content, honey can also be used following training to promote glycogen restoration so there are sufficient stores available for the next match or training session. How much depends on the intensity of the session as well as the time before the next session or match.

 

CARBOHYDRATES IN SPORT - MANUKA HONEY: 

Carbohydrate utilisation during exercise is dictated by the type of carbohydrate and the amount, as well as the exercise session itself. Carbohydrates are made up of saccharides, and when we eat them, they get broken down into monosaccharides (monos: single, sacchar: sugar) – glucose, fructose, and galactose. The intestines then absorb these monosaccharides and deliver them to their target organs via the bloodstream. Different types of carbohydrates consumed during exercise get metabolised at different rates. The maximum rate of carbohydrate oxidation during exercise was previously identified as 60 g/hour. Why? This is the rate the intestine can absorb glucose using a transporter called SGLT1. We now know that if we eat glucose with another form of carbohydrate, e.g., fructose, we can increase the absorption, and therefore oxidation, rates. Why? Fructose uses another type of transporter (GLUT5). Multiple transportable carbohydrates produce higher oxidation rates. Glucose is absorbed faster, while fructose is absorbed slower. This means a more sustained supply of energy to the working muscles. Performance improvements have been found in cycling where a 90 g/hour glucose-fructose drink was consumed during a 5-hour ride compared to glucose alone, and other research shows exercise performance improvements for glucose-fructose solutions if the exercise is over 2 hours in duration, and also in intermittent type activities.

Honey is primarily carbohydrates (~ 80%), mostly glucose (~ 30 – 35%) and fructose (~ 35 – 40%). Honey also contains vitamins, minerals, phenolic antioxidants, and in Manuka honey, MGO. Honey has a low to moderate glycaemic index (GI) depending on the ratio of carbohydrates present in the honey. The GI refers to how quickly blood glucose rises after eating a food, and foods are classified as either high, medium, or low depending on the insulin response to that food. Honey has a low to moderate GI, which is associated with its fructose content. Low GI products typically produce a lower insulin response and better blood glucose maintenance due to slower delivery of blood glucose. Honey is a natural food source that contains both glucose and fructose (multiple transportable carbohydrates), as well as other valuable nutrients. The glucose and fructose provide energy to working muscles during prolonged activity and activity interspersed with high intensity efforts (intermittent). It is recommended to consume carbohydrate at a rate of 60 g/hour for sessions over 2 hours in duration, and 30 – 60 g/hour for sessions that are 60 – 90 minutes long. If higher doses can be tolerated, then 90 g/hour has shown benefits to performance. Most research has used athletes and well-trained athletes, and athletes who perform at lower exercise intensities may have lower carbohydrate oxidation rates and will not need as much.

Honey can also be used before exercise, and due to its lower GI will provide a more sustained release of glucose during the exercise session. While the general recommendations are established by literature and scientific evidence, there are always individual differences, so test the timing and dose during training sessions to find what works for you.

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